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Poofteenth…..the discussion continues

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During my diatribe about feral pigs damaging the Great Barrier Reef (here), I made passing reference to "poofteenth" as a unit of measurement.

A robust debate followed which lasted well into the wee small hours of the following morning.

Furthermore, some additional private correspondence has since been received challenging my assertion that one poofteenth was equal to three-eighths of bugger-all (or 0.375 SFA in metric).

Professor Christopher, who was recently appointed to The Bucket as its mathematics, science and aviation expert, assures me that;
1 poofteenth, when multiplied by 1 umpteenth still equals one poofteenth.

Another reliable source went on to point out that 1 poofteenth is that number which, when multiplied by itself, equals negative three eighths or – .375.
(Yeah, right…like any positive number can be multiplied by anything to turn it into a negative……now pull the other one).

Whilst continued debate on this subject will doubtless be thoroughly unproductive, futile, and a total waste of time, I nevertheless wholeheartedly encourage it anyway on the grounds that I am beginning to look pretty sane in comparison to some of you lot out there.

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About GOF

"Life is like a sewer. What you get out of it, depends upon what you put into it." (Tom Lehrer)

12 responses »

  1. I am beginning to look pretty sane in comparison to some of you lot out there.I don't doubt that for a minute, GOF. But I must confess that I do wonder at times at the sanity of those who read my blog…

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  2. I was under the impression that a poofteenth was equivalent to 6 Fanny Adams trapped between a rock and a hard place??? Don't tell me I've been wrong all these years.

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  3. Being American, we rarely say "bugger," so you'll find "fuck-all" around here. πŸ™‚

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  4. Your blog is a haven of knowledge and sanity Snowy….whereas this ????????

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  5. Same measurement….just a hemispherical ambiguity.I am not the right person to tell you that you have been wrong all these years πŸ˜‰

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  6. So what do you call a spade? (hope that transfers OK between cultures…..my apologies if it does not…….sometimes only me and Globet understand my attempt at humour) I did make reference to all you metricated types who have converted to SFA…..one day we will catch up with you.

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  7. Your blog is a haven of knowledge and sanity SnowyYes, but I don't get into the deep and meaningful stuff like defining a poofteenth. I stand in awe…

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  8. You are easily awed my friend πŸ˜‰

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  9. The US isn't metricated; although my 3rd grade teacher told us we would be by the time we graduated high school — in 1990. Wrong, Mrs. B!I'm assuming your joke is spade can be used to describe a tool or an ethnicity.At the Farm, we refer to shovels as … shovels: pointy-head shovel, gravel shovel or flat-shovel, long-handled shovel, baby-shovel, etc. We're not known for vocabulary. It's usually descriptive terms. The people of Pa Kettle's generation graduated 8th grade (age 14) and went on to their adult lives. Pa Kettle was the youngest of 9 kids and was the only to attend high school, let alone graduate. There could be something of that behind our Simplicity.

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  10. I find a lot to identify with when you write about your farm life, and I am to this day an admirer of simplicity, and the innate wisdom that rural people possess.City people might tend to call a spade a spade. Rural folk here occasionally are prone to call it a "fucking shovel". We still have a weird mix of metric and imperial measurements even though we've been converting to metric for 40 years.

    Reply
  11. One of my city-slicker friends sent me a card one time:I have friends in overalls whose friendship I would not swap for the favor of the kings of the world.

    Thomas A. EdisonPractically made me tear up and I'm not typically a weeper. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  12. Really nice quote…..thanks m-t

    Reply

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