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It just got up and went

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‘Tis a funny thing you know,
To look back o’er a shoulder
To where childhood once did grow
Into youth, then slightly older.
For suddenly it vanished,
Lost innocence to lament.
By Father Time ’twas banished.
It just got up and went.

And then there was agility.
Climbing mountains in the rain.
An unlimited ability
To jog without the pain.
A body trim to flex, contort
Was just as nature meant.
Today I’m feeling quite distraught,
‘Cos it just got up and went.

And accuity of vision.
Threading needles in the wink
Of an eye, with precision.
Gone forever one would think.
All the girls I ogled locally,
For ocular entertainment
Now indistinct bifocally,
Since sight got up and went.

Simple life got filled with stuff,
A tractor, house and car.
There never seemed to be enough
For life’s fiscal bazaar.
Reflecting now it’s time to laugh
At inept mismanagement.
When piggy bank got filled to half
It just got up and went.

Seems just last week on Monday,
That Inga was still a teen.
Then university on the Thursday.
Tennis lessons in between.
An Aussie Navratilova,
Alas, gifts not heaven sent.
We’d only started to know her.
She just got up and went.

My hourglass sand’s diminished.
Enough for just a while
Get a couple of projects finished.
And write, edit, compile.
Cherish friends, a sunny day,
But even more impor-tent,
Are memories stored, for they,
Have not got up and went.

.

.
YET!

 

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About GOF

"Life is like a sewer. What you get out of it, depends upon what you put into it." (Tom Lehrer)

26 responses »

  1. I LOVE this!

    I have been all nostalgic lately thinking about how quickly the kids “got up and went”.

    This is just perfect!

    Reply
    • Thanks Lauri, it’s a life changing transition when the kids leave home.

      Older life involves a lot of what Desidera terms “gracefully surrendering the things of youth”.

      I have a lot of trouble with the “grace” bit. πŸ™‚

      Reply
  2. So true, GOF. A bit sad that young Globet didn’t turn out to be another Martina, as she could have supported you in your old age. Better supported you, that is. I expect she’ll still want to support you…

    Reply
  3. Well GOF……as I see it, you’re a clever humorist, a writer of children’s stories, & now a poet. Most certainly…….those talents have not “got up & went!!” πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  4. GOF, if it’s any comfort to you, those girls you ogled when you were young also are wearing bifocals. You probably look pretty handsome to them now. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
    • Thanks for your wise counsel HG. Few of the girls who possessed 20/20 vision would have considered me “pretty handsome” even at the peak of my “Handsomeness” 40 years ago. It has been a downhill journey for me ever since. πŸ™‚

      Reply
  5. Great poem. You’re so talented!

    Reply
  6. Wonderful, GOF. A bit nostalgic and sad as well. I never realized how hard it would be on all of us when our oldest son left home. I cannot imagine what it will continue to be like as they grow up and leave, one after another. One of the reasons I love photography and capturing special moments is because I realize that this busy time in our lives, when the kids are growing up, will be over far too fast. We will still see them of course, and hopefully some of them will live close by. But I will always enjoy the pictures, the slideshows, and the memories of the precious times our family has had over the years.

    Reply
    • I’m not sure if it gets any easier “with numbers” of children leaving home Freedom.
      We only had one.
      A main driver for this blogging of mine is to provide Mrs GOF and Inga with some memories after I have departed.
      Your blog is the perfect example of what you can do to create such a lasting legacy for your family.

      Reply
  7. I dunno GOF, seems like last Monday to me too. Nice bit of literature here 8)

    Reply
  8. Loved this. Whatever it is, It runs fast after a certain age, that’s for sure.

    Things you have not lost: humor, kindness, good looks and your abillity to be a damned good father.

    Reply
  9. I thought I was reading a poet work and would find a disclaimer at the bottom. That was until I saw the Inga mention.

    What more can I say except it’s not very modern? It rhymes.

    Reply

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